2013 NYC Fringe Fest: PENINSULA

976633_550466868330004_1753743494_oAt least they have a cast that are all eye-candy…Here’s hoping to see that bubble but on the poster live onstage.

From the press release:

PENINSULA, a world-premiere play by Nathan Wright, will be presented as part of the 17th Annual New York International Fringe Festival – Fringe NYC, held this year from August 9th – 25th. Produced by In Absentia Productions and directed by Nadia Foskolou, PENINSULA stars Angela Atwood, Vanessa Bartlett, Josué Gutierrez Guerra, Kellan Peavy, Marc Sinoway (Logo’s “Hunting Season”), and John Zdrojeski. PENINSULA will play five performances at ‘Fringe Venue #16,’ Robert Moss Theater at 440 Studios (440 Lafayette Street): Wednesday, 8/14 at 4:15 pm; Friday, 8/16 at 8:45 pm; Saturday, 8/17 at 5:15 pm; Monday 8/19 at 9:00 pm; and Thursday 8/22 at 2:30 pm. For tickets, which will go on sale on Friday, July 19th, visit FringeNYC.org or call 866-468-7619.

PENINSULA tells the story of Tiago, a young man who escaped the poverty-stricken slums of Rio de Janeiro, now working as a migrant in a seemingly peaceful summer town in Northern Michigan’s wine country. A visceral exploration of shifting identity, power and desire, PENINSULAexplodes with poetry, sensuality, and danger.

2 Comments

  1. Good news: There is a TON of frontal male nudity in the play Peninsula. Bad news: You don’t get to see any of it in this production! Turns out the creatives “went back and forth” about doing the nudity, according to one source, but since the Fringe’s five, sold-out performaces would attract a lot of “photographs and press,” they decided to take “the more conservative approach.” So these cute, young actors keep taking off their clothes and putting them back on, but MIMICKING taking off their clothes and putting them back on. I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s like watching Marcel Marceau in Take Me Out. Ah, well. There are always future productions, which this new play will probably get.

    1. Thanks for the info. That is disappointing. Why produce a play with a ton of nudity in the script only to chicken out at the last minute? If the playwright intended the nudity to be there, shouldn’t it be there?

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s