THREESOME

threesomeExcerpt from Seattle Times:

“The appearance of full frontal nudity in American “legit” theater no longer sparks the shock and scandal it used to. Not to mention the arrests and jail stints.The question arose again with two new plays presented in Seattle, “Threesome” at ACT Theatre by Yussef El Guindi and Book-It Repertory Theatre’s “Slaughterhouse-Five” (an adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel), which included sustained, nongratuitous (to my mind) displays of full-frontal nudity.

Neither featured blink-and-you-miss-it flashes of male privates, as in a 1993 Seattle Repertory Theatre staging of John Guare’s “Six Degrees of Separation” that had subscribers up in arms. This is about the full Monty.

I’ll set the scene: In Seattle playwright El Guindi’s “Threesome,” which has ended its run, a young man visits a couple’s home for a prearranged menage a trois. Though his inhibited hosts stay garbed, their guest peels to the buff and spends most of Act 1 lounging on and around their bed, letting it all hang out.”

THE GOOD NEWS: THREESOME IS COMING TO NEW YORK at 59E59 THEATER!!!

JUL 11, 2015 – AUG 23, 2015
Portland Center Stage
& A Contemporary Theatre (ACT) presents

THREESOME

By YUSSEF EL GUINDI
Directed by CHRIS COLEMAN
With ALIA ATTALLAH*, QUINN FRANZEN*, and KARAN OBEROI*
Leila and Rashid, Egyptian Americans with ties to Cairo, attempt to solve their relationship issues by inviting a relative stranger into their bedroom to engage in a threesome. What begins as a hilariously awkward evening soon becomes an experience fraught with secrets, raising issues of sexism, possession and independence.

Please Note: Threesome is recommended for ages 17+; contains male and female nudity, strong language, and mature content.

http://www.59e59.org/moreinfo.php?showid=209

17 Comments

  1. About 5 minutes in the guy on the left, Quinn Franzen, walks out fully nude. He has average body, untrimmied and uncut. He is unclothed for pretty much the first act. Any seat is good. The other guy, Karan Oberi, strips down around 2/3 into the first act and will get out and get dressed. If you are on the audience right in the first few rows you will be able to see him briefly as he gets dressed (unfortunately I was on the left and didn’t get to see anything). I thought the first half was much better than the second half (which incidentally does not have any male nudity).

  2. Thanks, m-lo, for the prompt report, which I wish I’d seen before buying a ticket on the left. Still, I’m not sure it would have made any difference in the second instance of nudity because the big chair on the right corner of the stage might block any view from even the most extreme, right-sided seat (#12). I wanted to sight-line it myself, but the people in seats A8. 10 & 12 didn’t get up at intermission! (Doesn’t anybody pee anymore?). As for the first instance of nudity, by Quinn Franzen, it’s the most prolonged nudity I’ve seen in a play in years, and the set is lit like somebody’s about to perform surgery. Huge, uncut, pinkish low hangers, full bush and any seat within a mile is fine. Franzen might be the most at-ease actor I’ve ever seen do nudity. Worth the trip for that alone. And if it weren’t for that damned chair I’d definitely go again.

  3. Adding to above… Quinn Franzen is super sexy. He’s a tall, dirty-blonde with practically no body hair and a very thick uncut dick, low hangers and a full bush. He’s not ripped or very muscular, but he is in great shape — a very real body. Yes, he enters naked and stays naked for about an hour (sometimes under covers) on a well lit stage. Its a definite 5 on the rating scale. Not a great play (for me) — but not terrible. Quinn is worth the trip!

  4. Yes, yes, yes, but …. I can’t get my mind off the second actor in the piece whose nudity might be blocked from practically every seat in the house. The only reason I can think of for such studious coyness, apart from the actor’s natural reluctance, perhaps not to compete with Franzen’s formidable endowment, is that the character is Egyptian, which means he’s probably cut, and the actor playing him is of East Indian descent, which means he’s probably uncut. The cleverest handling of this foreskin conundrum I’ve ever seen was in my favorite production of The Normal Heart at the the Public Theater many years ago, with Raul Esparza as Ned Weeks and Joanna Gleason as the doctor. In the examination scene, she pulls down his striped boxers — he’s standing, she’s in a wheelchair — past his pubes and down his shaft, stopping just short of the tip of his penis. The likeliest explanation: Weeks is Jewish & Esparza is Cuban-American. But I love how much they gave the audience without causing confusion, instead of just sticking a plant or table in front of an actor, which makes you wonder: Why bother with the “nudity” at all? At the same time, Will Pullen’s character in Punk Rock would almost certainly be uncut and Will conspicuously is not, which suggests how everybody should handle nudity in theater: Just go with what you got & let talent lead the way.

  5. I think if you sat on the far right row about row C, D or E (above the chair), you may be able to see better

  6. Thanks, mo-lo. That occurred to me when I was at the theater, but then I thought by the time you sit far back enough you’d need binoculars to see anything — and even I’M not that nuts! But I think you’re right: Three or four rows back in the 12 seat.

  7. Welq: slightly off-topic, but did you see Haskell King in GOOD AFTERNOON recently? As a fellow Haskell King fan and an admirer of his bush in productions past, I figure you might have caught that show. Even if it’s just a bush show, if it’s Haskell, it’s news.

  8. Thanks for asking, garytier. Unfortunately missed it because I was of town for almost the entire run, though I’m happy to share your enthusiasm for King, from the essential Afterclap to the Boca Raton production of Take Me Out, where he stole the show as Jason (a hard part to steal a show in) and where I first saw his magnificent bush, which I’m glad to hear is holding up! There’s a heartfelt appreciation of King by Afterclap playwright Daniel Reitz on nytheatre.com which really gives you an inside view of what he puts into his work and mentions all kinds of things with him I’ve never seen. Too bad we’re limited to one lifetime and only one pair of eyes.

  9. Welq: It was nice to have Haskell back and showing his stuff. Like everything else about him, even his pubes are perfect–lush and thick and black and full, and you could hear the audience gasp when he flashed them. Of course, the ne plus ultra was the groundbreaking Afterclap–King kind of paved the way for young hotties like Quinn Franzen to be freely, fully nude for huge amounts of stage time. Thanks for the tip about Daniel Reitz’s nytheatre.com piece on Haskell King the actor and the person–just found it and read it. Made me realize that, with his combination of physical beauty, sex appeal, drive and talent, there’s nothing stopping King–both as a sex object and a seriously gifted actor. You’re right–with King you need extra pairs of eyes because there’s so much to look at, up and down and at the same time!

  10. garytier: I am delighted to hear King still elicits gasps, one of my favorite sounds in a theater during a nude scene. It shows people are feeling what they’re seeing. One elderly woman sitting two seats to my left at a performance at Punk Rock actually let out a scream when Will pulled down his pants, which I thought entirely appropriate since inside my head I was screaming, “Thank God!” I heard those same words at a Broadway matinee of Take Me Out when Neal Huff takes off his towel and is joined in the shower by the rest of the team/cast; a young woman behind me murmured, ‘Thank God.” I don’t think actors realize how grateful we are for these moments of literal revelation. During these moments, my hearing fades, the audience recedes a bit and images accelerate into slow motion, which is why we often think nude scenes last longer than they really do. It’s the same sensation Oscar winners describe at the moment the envelope is opened and you hear your name. It’s an occasion that calls for, at the very least, gasps.

  11. Oh, King elicited gasps all right–and that was just by exposing his pubes. I, too, have been at plays during which, when the nudity occurs, people actually do cry out because the tension is broken, the delivery of the promise has been made. Sometimes, the payoff is there before the audience knows to expect it–like for instance, in the beginning of Afterclap. The audience walked in and there was King’s ass to greet everyone, as he was curled up in a fetal position. Everybody knew taking their seats that the promise of what was to come was already fulfilled–that he would roll over, the play would begin, and we would not only see him physically but also psychically. It was a such a bold gesture of staging, and of communicating the emotional state of the character. The audience didn’t gasp because it was holding its collective breath in anticipation of what King would do next. There was tension throughout, because we knew we were in the hands of a fearless actor. Like the actors in Take Me Out, and like this young actor Franzen. It’s pure theatricality at its most primal and satisfying. And old women LOVE it. At Take Me Out they ate it up. What does that tell you about untapped needs on the part of the audience? Btw, I too saw Haskell in Florida and I agree he stole the show right out from Sebastian LaCause and all of them–his acting and his body and his energy were breathtaking. He was the talk of the intermission crowd. It’s what made me really notice him.

  12. It’s so true what you say about older women & TMO; some in that Boca crowd, whose average age hovered around 88, sounded like bacherlorettes at Magic Mike XXL, despite the one poor gentleman who was sleeping and taking dumps in his Depends. It was the only production of Take Me Out that had a distinct odor, but it was also among the most fun because its audience seized every opportunity for pleasure as if it were the last plane out of Da Nang. Similarly, King grabbed at an ingenious interpretation of Jason, the well-meaning, possibly closeted dimwit “up from Asheville.” Of the 19 actors I’ve seen play that part, all over the country, King is unique: Instead of indicating Jason’s slowness of mind with retarded speech & movement, he sped up his dialogue and skidded around like a pixilated spider. The shock of it alone was charming. And funny.

  13. And he did the same thing in Turnabout: the lights came up after a sad reunion of two exes, both of whom have sapped all the love from each other–and then up came the lights and there he was in a thong, ushering in new life. It was the perfect antidote to the morose ex-lovers in the first scene. He was life incarnate, strutting, bending over, squirting water in his mouth. The audience adored him. Very similar to the knowing energy I saw him exhibit in Boca. He’s just not afraid to be cock-out life-affirming.

  14. Here’s some King bait: As far as I know, they still haven’t cast the role of Jamie in the upcoming Broadway revival of Long Day’s Journey Into Night with Jessica Lange, Gabriel Byrne and John Gallagher Jr. At first, I just assumed Gallagher, age 31, would be playing older brother Jamie. but he’s playing tubercular younger brother Edmund, perhaps because Lange & Byrne are in their mid-60s, so their children would have to skew older than usual. Could there be an in for King as Jamie? If so, he’d have a tall order to erase the memory of Broadway’s last Jamie, Philip Seymour Hoffman, who was so inventive and devastating in a performance that went on to lose the Featured Actor Tony that year to …. Denis O’Hare in Take Me Out! (As much as I love TMO, I’d still have voted for Hoffman). My original fantasy was to have Gallagher play Jamie and — drum roll, please — Edmund would be played by Will Pullen, who’d have been perfect for it. But it looks, garytier, that neither one of our boys has a clear shot at a project that seems determined to transcend off-Broadway deities.

  15. Interesting. I think King would make more sense as Edmund–the tubercular frailty might be a slight stretch for him physically but emotionally he could do it. But since there’s only Jamie to cast (I find it hard to believe such a pivotal role wasn’t already offered to any number of “stars”) I could definitely see King have a rip-roaring time with it, and provide an interesting sexuality to the role. You’re right it would skew older, and King is the perfect age as he’s around Gallagher’s age of 31. King has the chops for sure. One could imagine King having an incestuous moment with mama Lange. The interesting thing about King is I’ve never been sure what his sexual orientation is in “real life”, he’s so charismatic he could–probably is–both.

  16. You’re quite right: They’re waiting for a movie star’s schedule to open up before making an announcement. But it’s going to have to be somebody with Broadway cred, like Bradley Cooper or Jake Gyllenhaal. As for the sexual orientation of actors, King included, I either get a straight vibe or a gay vibe or a somewhere-in-between vibe and leave it at that. After seeing TMO for the first time, I thought, “Denis is gay & the rest are straight.” Whether that is true — then or now — I have no idea & almost zero curiosity (though Denis, of course, is out). When it comes to nudity, I’m drawn to a straight vibe, though Jordan Geiger in The Correspondent — playing a character pretending to be a woman, no less — did it for me big time. King? I’d put him put him some place between straight and somewhere-in-between, but if he wants to prove me wrong my phone number is….

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